Basic Security and Firearms Education & Training

About Security Guards
Security guards, also called security officers, patrol and inspect property to protect against fire, theft, vandalism, terrorism and illegal activity. They protect their employer's property, enforce laws on the property, deter criminal activity and other problems. These workers may be armed. They use various forms of telecommunications to call for assistance from police, fire or emergency medical services. Security guards write comprehensive reports outlining their observations and activities during their assigned shift. They also may interview witnesses or victims, prepare case reports and testify in court.

All security officers must show good judgment and common sense, follow directions, testify accurately in court and follow company policy and guidelines. In an emergency, they must be able to take charge and direct others to safety. In larger organizations, a security manager might oversee a group of security officers. In smaller organizations, however, a single worker may be responsible for all security.

License and Certification
Illinois law require that guards be licensed. To be licensed as a guard, individuals must be at least 21 years old, pass a background check and complete classroom training in such subjects as property rights, emergency procedures and detention of suspected criminals. Drug testing often is required and may be ongoing and random. Guards who carry weapons must be licensed by the appropriate government authority and some receive further certification as special police officers, allowing them to make limited types of arrests while on duty. Armed guard positions also have more stringent background checks and entry requirements than those of unarmed guards.

Job Prospects
Job opportunities for security guards should be favorable because of growing demand for these workers and the need to replace experienced workers who leave the occupation. In addition to full-time job opportunities, the limited training requirements and flexible hours attract many people seeking part-time or second jobs. However, competition is expected for higher paying positions that require longer periods of training; these positions usually are found at facilities that require a high level of security, such as nuclear power plants or weapons installations. Applicants with prior experience in the gaming industry should enjoy the best prospects for jobs as gaming surveillance officers.

Salary Estimates
Median annual wages of security guards were $23,460 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $19,150 and $30,100. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $16,680 and the highest 10 percent earned more than $39,360. Median annual wages in the industries employing the largest numbers of security guards were:
   • General Medical and Surgical Hospitals - $29,020
   • Elementary and Secondary Schools - $27,980
   • Local Government - $27,660
   • Traveler Accommodation - $25,660
   • Investigation and Security Services - $22,170

Gaming surveillance officers and gaming investigators had median annual wages of $28,850 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $23,000 and $37,690. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $19,290 and the highest 10 percent earned more than $48,310The Triton College School of Continuing Education course meets the requirements of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation as outlined in the Detective Act. It covers security fundamentals for new officers and provides a review for experienced employees who want to earn state certification. This course, along with PERC-Permanent Employee Registration Card (PERC application and fee not included in course fee) is needed for employees of private security agencies.

Topics include:
   • Security Code of Ethics
   • Public and Human Relations
   • Illinois Criminal Code (related to protection of persons and property)
   • Fire and Accident Rrevention/Fire Safety
   • Patrol Procedures
   • Liability Issues
   • Use of Force and Handling Hostile Individuals
   • Arrest and Control Techniques
   • Laws Regarding Arrest/Search and Seizure
   • Report Writing
   • The Law on Private Security and Reporting to Law Enforcement Agencies

PSA E02 - Private Security Basic Training (1.5 AEC)
Course Description: This course meets the requirements of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation as outlined in the Detective Act. It covers security fundamentals for new officers and provides a review for experienced employees who want to earn state certification. This course, along with a Permanent Employee Registration Card (PERC), is needed for employees of private security agencies.

Fall 2013
Dates: Saturdays, October 19, 2013 - November 2, 2013
Time: 8:00 a.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Room: F-102

Spring 2014
Dates: Saturdays, January 25, 2014 - February 8, 2014
Time: 8:00 a.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Room: A-122A

Dates: Saturdays, April 5, 2014 - April 26, 2014
Time: 8:00 a.m. - 3:45 p.m.
Room: A-122A

20-HOUR FIREARMS
Armed officers in Illinois need 40 hours of instruction in order to be certified by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation to carry a firearm in the line of duty. After completing a 20-hours basic course, students enroll in this 20-hour firearms class to become state certified. Two days of classroom instruction and a written examination are followed by another day on the live fire range for final qualification.

A current Illinois Firearm Owner’s Identification Card (FOID) is a prerequisite to receive firearms training at Triton College. Your FOID card must be presented to the firearms instructor at the beginning of the first day of class. Out-of-state students are exempt from this requirement.

Topics include:
   • Legal Use of Firearms
   • Liability while Armed
   • Search/Seizure/Arrest
   • Ethics of Firearm Use
   • Procedures while Armed
   • Firearms Safety and Maintenance
   • Use of Deadly Force

PSA E25 - Private Security Firearms Training (1.5 AEC)
Course Description: Armed officers in Illinois need 40 hours of instruction in order to be certified by the Illinois DFPR to carry a firearm in the line of duty. After completing a 20-hour basic course, students enroll in this 20-hour firearms class to become state certified. Classroom instruction is followed by a written test and range qualification. NOTE: A current Illinois Firearm Owner's Identification Card (FOID) is a prerequisite to receive firearms training at Triton College. Your FOID card must be presented to the firearms instructor at the beginning of the first day of class. (Out-of state residents are exempt from this requirement).

Fall 2013
Dates: Saturdays, November 16, 2013 - November 30, 2013
Times:
  8a.m. - 4:30 p.m., First Day
  8 a.m. - 7:30 p.m., Second Day
  8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Third Day - At the Range
Room: A-122A

Spring 2013
Dates: Saturdays, February 15, 2014 - March 1, 2014
Times:
  8a.m. - 4:30 p.m., First Day
  8 a.m. - 7:30 p.m., Second Day
  8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Third Day - At the Range
Room: A-122A

Dates: Saturdays, May 3, 2014 - May 17, 2014
Times:
  8a.m. - 4:30 p.m., First Day
  8 a.m. - 7:30 p.m., Second Day
  8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Third Day - At the Range
Room: A-122A

 

To register for these classes please click HERE.

For more information call Triton College Continuing Education at (708) 456-0300, Ext. 3500 or email askCE@triton.edu