SPRING 2018

RHT 086-001 - Meets M/W 11am-12:15pm Room E-145

   

RHT 086 Homework Assignments – Due 4/11/18-5/16/18 (Final Conferences)

 

Due Wednesday, 4/11/18

--Complete a set of flashcards for the word parts on p. 90 in Handout Packet #3.

--Complete the summary part of the assignment for Reading Process #6 “Reading Literature Makes Us Smarter and Nicer.” You will have had these assignments checked off in class on 4/9, but you need to re-submit the entire assignment, including the summary on Wednesday. If we do not complete the discussion questions in class on Monday, you are expected to finish those as well.

 

Due Monday, 4/16/18

--Complete the Reading Process #7 Main Idea & Bias on pp. 93-96 in Handout Packet #3. You do NOT need to answer the questions on p. 97 yet.

--Complete the MRL Critical Thinking (R3.20) topic.

 

Due Wednesday, 4/18/18

-Study your most recent set of flashcards (p. 90 word parts) for Word Parts Quiz #2. This will be worth 35 points and include questions about Patterns of Organization (R3.8), Purpose and Tone (R3.18) and Critical Reading/Thinking (R3.20).

 

Due Monday, 4/23/18

--Complete ALL of the questions on p. 97 using articles 1,2 and 3 on pp. 95-96. You may need to look back at notes or MyReadingLab lessons to answer the questions thoroughly.

 

Due Wednesday, 4/25/18 

--No homework due.

 

Due Monday, 4/30/18

--Complete the Reading Process Contrasting POVs assignment on pp. 105-110.

Due Wednesday, 5/2/18 

--No homework due, but you should be working on the Reading Process Final Project, due 5/9.

 

Due Monday, 5/7/18 

--No homework due but be prepared to take the Accuplacer Reading Test. You can go to the following link to see what kinds of questions the test consists of:   

 http://www.accuplacerpracticetest.com/accuplacer-reading-comprehension-practice-test/ 

I have also provided you with review materials and other links in Handout Packet #3, pp. 139-143.

--Instead of coming to E145, go directly to the Testing Center for class (Room A-126). You will be taking the Accuplacer Reading Placement Test as part of your final exam. CLASSS MEETS IN A-126.    

 

Due Wednesday, 5/9/18

--The Reading Process Final Project on pp. 111-132 in Handout Packet #3 (worth 125 points), which you have been working on in and out of class, is due. No late submissions accepted!!

 

 Due Monday, 5/14/18  - This is the last actual class meeting.    

--Study for Part Two of your final exam—the objective test that will be based on topics found on the review sheet in Handout Packet #3, p. 145.

--Five Lexile Readings at 1200 level or above need to be completed by class time to receive full credit for this assignment, which will equal 10% of the final point total.

--Be sure to check your conference time for Wednesday before you leave class.

 

FINAL CONFERENCES  -  Wednesday, 5/16, from 12-1:50pm in E145.

These conferences will take place during our normally scheduled final exam time, but you will already have completed the final on 5/14. Remember you’ll only be coming for a short conference within the allotted time frame. You will know what time you need to show up at our USUAL CLASSROOM because you will have signed up for a conference during a previous class. You do not need to bring anything to this meeting. During this conference, I’ll let you know your Accuplacer score, course average, final grade and whether you have made have met your reading requirement for RHT 101. You’ll also get any leftover graded work back at the conference.   

 

Due Wednesday 4/4/18 

--Complete the MRL Purpose and Tone module (R3.18). Look at your MRL handout for directions on what is required for this type of assignment as well as how to access it. Remember you must be in the READING SKILLS LEARNING PATH to find this module.

To receive full credit for a MyReadingLab module you must complete the following:

    • Read the overview
     
    • View the Model OR the Animation
     
    • Complete the Recall with a score of 60% or higher in 2 tries
     
    • Complete Practice 1 with a score of 60% or higher in two tries
     
    • Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries
     

 

 

Due Monday, 4/9/18

 

--Complete Reading Process Assignment #5. Use the assignment sheet and article attached to this handout, NOT the assignment sheet in packet #2.

 

You do NOT need to complete part 6—the summary of the article—for Monday.

 

 

Reading Process Assignment #5                Name: ________________________

35 points – due ________________

 

Directions: Read the attached article, “Reading Literature Makes Us Smarter and Nicer” and complete the following. Be sure to clearly number each part.

 

Prereading – on a separate sheet:

    • Create two pre-reading questions from the title.
     
    • Google the author’s name and read the information that comes up about her in the right-hand column of the search results page. Summarize her credentials.

     

    Active reading – on the reading:

    • Read and annotate the text. As you read, box transitions. Look for evidence of patterns of organization and mark them. Summarize paragraphs in the margins. Note any connections between ideas. Write down your reactions to the ideas presented as you read. Mark any confusing sections.

     

    Post-reading – on a separate sheet:

    4) Do vocabulary entries for three words you want to learn from the reading. Include the word, its part of speech, the complete sentence from the text and your understanding of the word’s meaning or a brief dictionary definition if you need to look it up to figure it out. If word analysis or context clues helped you figure out the meaning, explain that process.

     

    5) Answer the Critical Reading questions below on separate paper:

    a) What is the topic of the article? Is the author qualified to write about this topic? Explain.

    b) What is the main idea the author is defending? Is it explicit or implicit? Provide evidence.

    c) What is the relationship between the first two paragraphs? Does the author agree more with the experts in paragraph two or the expert in paragraph one? How do you know? Provide textual evidence.

    d) In paragraph six, name two words that indicate a contrast pattern. Indicate the transition that lets you know this research is recent. What transition later in the paragraph indicates that an additional idea about the research is being presented?

    e) We have read articles that rely on personal experience to defend the author’s claims. This article does not do that. What kind of evidence does the author provide? Cite a couple of examples.

     

    6) Write a summary of the article:

    --Type up a rough draft summary of the article and print it out. Use the summary checklist (from Handout Packet #2) to label the parts you do or do not have and to help you create rewriting notes. It may also help to look back at your “Black Skin/White Coat” summary.

    --After you complete your rewriting notes, pull up your rough draft on the computer, save it as a final draft and make any necessary changes. Highlight the changes on the FINAL DRAFT. Staple both drafts and any rewriting notes to the assignment.

 

 

Reading Literature Makes Us Smarter and Nicer

"Deep reading" is vigorous exercise from the brain and increases our real-life capacity for empathy

 

By Annie Murphy Paul @anniemurphypaul

 

June 03, 2013

 

Published in Time magazine

 

1 Gregory Currie, a professor of philosophy at the University of Nottingham, recently argued in the New York Times that we ought not to claim that literature improves us as people, because there is no “compelling evidence that suggests that people are morally or socially better for reading Tolstoy” or other great books.

 

2 Actually, there is such evidence. Raymond Mar, a psychologist at York University in Canada, and Keith Oatley, a professor emeritus of cognitive psychology at the University of Toronto, reported in studies published in 2006 and 2009 that individuals who often read fiction appear to be better able to understand other people, empathize with them and view the world from their perspective. This link persisted even after the researchers factored in the possibility that more empathetic individuals might choose to read more novels. A 2010 study by Mar found a similar result in young children: the more stories they had read to them, the keener their “theory of mind,” or mental model of other people’s intentions.

 

3 “Deep reading” — as opposed to the often superficial reading we do on the Web — is an endangered practice, one we ought to take steps to preserve as we would a historic building or a significant work of art. Its disappearance would imperil the intellectual and emotional development of generations growing up online, as well as the perpetuation of a critical part of our culture: the novels, poems and other kinds of literature that can be appreciated only by readers whose brains, quite literally, have been trained to apprehend them.

 

4 Recent research in cognitive science, psychology and neuroscience has demonstrated that deep reading — slow, immersive, rich in sensory detail and emotional and moral complexity — is a distinctive experience, different in kind from the mere decoding of words. Although deep reading does not, strictly speaking, require a conventional book, the built-in limits of the printed page are uniquely conducive to the deep reading experience. A book’s lack of hyperlinks, for example, frees the reader from making decisions — Should I click on this link or not? — allowing her to remain fully immersed in the narrative.

 

5 That immersion is supported by the way the brain handles language rich in detail, allusion and metaphor: by creating a mental representation that draws on the same brain regions that would be active if the scene were unfolding in real life. The emotional situations and moral dilemmas that are the stuff of literature are also vigorous exercise for the brain, propelling us inside the heads of fictional characters and even, studies suggest, increasing our real-life capacity for empathy.

 

6 None of this is likely to happen when we’re scrolling through TMZ. Although we call the activity by the same name, the deep reading of books and the information-driven reading we do on the Web are very different, both in the experience they produce and in the capacities they develop. A growing body of evidence suggests that online reading may be less engaging and less satisfying, even for the “digital natives” for whom it is so familiar. Last month, for example, Britain’s National Literacy Trust released the results of a study of 34,910 young people aged 8 to 16. Researchers reported that 39% of children and teens read daily using electronic devices, but only 28% read printed materials every day. Those who read only onscreen were three times less likely to say they enjoy reading very much and a third less likely to have a favorite book. The study also found that young people who read daily only onscreen were nearly two times less likely to be above-average readers than those who read daily in print or both in print and onscreen.

 

7 To understand why we should be concerned about how young people read, and not just whether they’re reading at all, it helps to know something about the way the ability to read evolved. “Human beings were never born to read,” notes Maryanne Wolf, director of the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts University and author of Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. Unlike the ability to understand and produce spoken language, which under normal circumstances will unfold according to a program dictated by our genes, the ability to read must be painstakingly acquired by each individual. The “reading circuits” we construct are recruited from structures in the brain that evolved for other purposes — and these circuits can be feeble or they can be robust, depending on how often and how vigorously we use them.

 

 

8 The deep reader, protected from distractions and attuned to the nuances of language, enters a state that psychologist Victor Nell, in a study of the psychology of pleasure reading, likens to a hypnotic trance. Nell found that when readers are enjoying the experience the most, the pace of their reading actually slows. The combination of fast, fluent decoding of words and slow, unhurried progress on the page gives deep readers time to enrich their reading with reflection, analysis, and their own memories and opinions. It gives them time to establish an intimate relationship with the author, the two of them engaged in an extended and ardent conversation like people falling in love.

 

9 This is not reading as many young people are coming to know it. Their reading is pragmatic and instrumental: the difference between what literary critic Frank Kermode calls “carnal reading” and “spiritual reading.” If we allow our offspring to believe carnal reading is all there is — if we don’t open the door to spiritual reading, through an early insistence on discipline and practice — we will have cheated them of an enjoyable, even ecstatic experience they would not otherwise encounter. And we will have deprived them of an elevating and enlightening experience that will enlarge them as people. Observing young people’s attachment to digital devices, some progressive educators and permissive parents talk about needing to “meet kids where they are,” molding instruction around their onscreen habits. This is mistaken. We need, rather, to show them someplace they’ve never been, a place only deep reading can take them.

 

This article is from the Brilliant Report, a weekly newsletter written by Murphy Paul

Annie Murphy Paul @anniemurphypaul

Paul is the author of Origins and the forthcoming book Brilliant: The New Science of Smart. The views expressed are solely her own.

 

 

 

 

RHT 086 Homework Assignments – 2/21/18-4/2/18

  

 Due Wednesday, 2/21/18

 

 --Complete Reading Process Assignment #2 found in Handout Packet #1, pp. 33-35.

--Study any notes you took during class on vocabulary strategies, look over your flashcards, and review the MRL Vocabulary module (R3.2) to prepare for Word Parts Quiz #1. The focus will be on the word parts, but there will be questions on the strategies (like word analysis and context clues) as well.

 

                                                                                                                                    

Due Monday, 2/26/18

 

Two MRL Modules are DUE:

 --MRL Supporting Details module (R3.5) AND the Outlining and Mapping module (R3.6). Look at your MRL handout for directions on what is required for this type of assignment as well as how to access it. Remember you must be in the READING SKILLS LEARNING PATH to find these modules.

--To receive full credit for a MyReadingLab module you must complete the following:

1)    Read the overview.

2)    View the Model OR the Animation.

3)    Complete the Recall with a score of 60% or higher in 2 tries.

4)    Complete Practice 1 with a score of 60% or higher in two tries.

5)    Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries.

 

--Complete the outline for “Hazards of Moviegoing” (pp. 36-38 in Handout Packet #1).

 

--Complete the Supporting Details exercise on pp. 49/50 in Handout Packet #2. 

 

 

Due Wednesday, 2/28/18

 

--Complete Reading Process #3 assignment (Handout Packet #2, p. 45-48).

 

 

Due Monday, 3/5/18

 

--Complete a set of flashcards for the word parts on p. 43 in Handout Packet #2. Remember that the flashcard assignment directions are in Handout Packet #1 if you need a reminder of how to do this. Also review my comments on the first sets of flashcards you did to avoid making similar mistakes.

 

--MRL Summarizing and Paraphrasing (R3.7) module due.  Look at your MRL handout for directions on what is required for this type of assignment as well as how to access it. Remember you must be in the READING SKILLS LEARNING PATH to find this module.

--To receive full credit for a MyReadingLab module you must complete the following:

1)    Read the overview

2)    View the Model OR the Animation

3)    Complete the Recall with a score of 60% or higher in 2 tries

4)    Complete Practice 1 with a score of 60% or higher in two tries

5)    Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries                                         (OVER)

Due Wednesday, 3/7/18

 

--Compose a summary of the article, “My Black Skin Makes My White Coat Vanish.” Consider what we discussed in class about summarizing. Use a checklist (pp. 69-73 in packet #2) to make sure you have included the required parts and structured the summary logically. This must be typed, double spaced in 12-point font. I would expect it to be somewhere between 7-10 sentence, depending on the complexity of your sentences. It can be longer than that but not shorter. You need to email this to me by class time AND bring two hard copies to class with you on Wednesday. Please send it as an attached Word document but ALSO copy the summary into the message box of your email in case I can’t open your attachment.

 

--If you have not reached Lexile level 1200, keep working toward that. If you have reached it, be sure to complete a total of five readings at that level. This is due by the end of the semester, so this is just a reminder to keep working on it. It is NOT due yet.

 

--Consider scheduling an appointment with your counselor to create an academic plan. This is the extra credit assignment described in the syllabus. My preference is that you get this done by the midterm. That way it can figure into your midterm average, and you’ll be ready to register for your next semester of classes as soon as registration opens up in April.

 

 

Due Monday, 3/12/18

 

--MRL Nine Patterns of Organization-Combined (R3.8) module due.  Look at your MRL handout for directions on what is required for this type of assignment as well as how to access it. Remember you must be in the READING SKILLS LEARNING PATH to find this module.

--To receive full credit for a MyReadingLab module you must complete the following:

1)    Read the overview

2)    View the Model OR the Animation

3)    Complete the Recall with a score of 60% or higher in 2 tries

4)    Complete Practice 1 with a score of 60% or higher in two tries

5)    Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries

 

 

 Due Wednesday, 3/14/18

--Study for the Midterm Exam. Focus on the topics listed on the review sheet included as the last page of this handout.  

 

 --The rewrite of your “Black Skin/White Coat” summary is due.  Complete the following:

 

 1.     Read over my comments on your rough draft summary and your checklist(s). 

 2.     Rewrite the summary on the computer. I suggest you pull up the rough draft and save it as a  

         final draft. 

 3.     Make suggested revisions and edits (refer to the editing pages in Handout Packet #2).

 4.     Be sure to save the new version to your flash drive. 

 5.     Print the summary final draft.  

 6.     On the copy, number parts 1-5 and 11/12 from the checklist.

7.     On this final draft copy, also highlight anything that changed (was revised or edited) from the rough draft. If you removed something that was originally in the rough draft, put a capital R on the final draft where that part used to be. 

 8.     Staple this final draft to the rough draft with my comments. Include any rewriting notes and feedback.

 

 

NO CLASS 3/17-3/25 – SPRING BREAK

 

 

Due Monday, 3/26/18

 

--No homework is due.

 

 

Due Wednesday, 3/28/18

 

--Complete the Reading Process assignment (Frederick Douglass excerpt) on pp. 79-88 in Handout Packet #2.

 

--MRL Reading Textbooks (R3.21) module due.  Look at your MRL handout for directions on what is required for this type of assignment as well as how to access it. Remember you must be in the READING SKILLS LEARNING PATH to find this module.

--To receive full credit for a MyReadingLab module you must complete the following:

1)    Read the overview

2)    View the Model OR the Animation

3)    Complete the Recall with a score of 60% or higher in 2 tries

4)    Complete Practice 1 with a score of 60% or higher in two tries

5)    Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries

 

 

Due Monday, 4/2/18

 

--No homework due.

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                               (OVER)

 

 

 

Midterm Exam Review Sheet – SPRING 2018

 

The lists below remind you of the concepts we’ve discussed so far this semester, which you’ll be tested on. The 75-point test will consist of multiple choice, true/false and fill-in-the-blank questions. There will also be a section that requires you to answer questions about topic, main idea, major details and minor details after reading a short text. Overall, the test covers vocabulary and comprehension strategies. Be sure to review the MRL Active Reading, Vocabulary, Main ideas, Supporting Details, Outlining, Summarizing and Patterns of Organization Reading Skills Modules, especially the Recall activities. The test also includes questions on the p. 43 word parts (second set of flashcards). Below are additional, detailed suggestions for studying.  

     

  To study, make sure you can:  

  --Identify topics, main ideas, major details, minor details   

  --Explain the difference between stated and implied main ideas

  --Explain various note-taking strategies, including annotating and outlining

  --Identify various context clue signal words   

  --Identify the characteristics of a good summary 

     

  Understand these terms:  

  Suffix  

  Prefix  

  Word analysis  

  Context clues / the four types and examples of each 

  Parts of speech  

  Connotation  

  Denotation  

  Implicit  

  Explicit   

  Thesis 

  Topic sentence  

  Outline  

  Comprehension  

  Active reading 

  Prior knowledge 

  Statistics 

  Pronoun 

  Transitions 

  Summary 

   

 

 

 

 

RHT 086 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS - due 1/24/18 – 2/19/18

Due Wednesday, 1/24/18

--Two completed worksheets from Handout Packet #1 distributed in class on 1/22: Student Information Sheet (pp. 3/4) and "Getting to Know Your Syllabus" (p. 1). This should include reading through the syllabus in its entirety.

--Start buying your materials for class as soon as possible (see first page of syllabus). Remember that the course textbook is really an access code you have to buy. Do NOT buy a book, even if someone helping you at the bookstore tells you that is what you have to buy. If anyone tells you that, they are mistaken. If you buy the wrong access code and break open the cardboard, you CANNOT return it. So in general, be sure to buy the access code (packaged in cardboard) listed on the syllabus. To be safe, DO NOT OPEN ANY PACKAGE until we are in class together. You are not required to do anything with the access code until you register at the MyReadingLab website IN CLASS next week.

Also, note that you’ll receive a few handout packets throughout the semester. They’ll be copied on three-hole paper, so you can collect these in a binder. You’re expected to bring these packets to every class meeting.

 

Due Monday, 1/29/18

--Complete the Reading Process Practice on pp. 21/22 in Handout Packet #1. The article you are supposed to read for the assignment is on p. 22. Use separate notebook paper if necessary to complete the assignment.

--Bring all class materials and the Campus Resources Assignment (p. 17) to class. Check off what you have with you on the checklist on p. 5 in Handout Packet #1.

 

Due Wednesday, 1/31/18

No homework due.

 

Due Monday, 2/5/18

--Read Process Asst #1 (pp. 23-29 Handout Packet #1).

--If you did not complete MyReadingLab registration and the Lexile Locator (see MRL handout directions on accessing this activity), do so by today.                                                                   

 

Due Wednesday, 2/7/18

--Complete a set of flashcards for the word parts on p. 12 in Handout Packet #1. Remember that assignment directions are on p. 7. Be sure to number each flashcard, and highlight the word-part word (WPW) and context clue (CC) in your original sentence on each card. Also, the cards MUST BE FASTENED with a rubber band or large paper clip in order for you to be able to turn them in.

Due Monday, 2/12/18

 --Complete the MRL Vocabulary module (R3.2). Look at your MRL handout for directions on what is required for this type of assignment as well as how to access it. Remember you must be in the READING SKILLS LEARNING PATH to find this module.

To receive full credit for a MyReadingLab module you must complete the following:

1)    Read the overview

2)   View the Model OR the Animation

3)   Complete the Recall with a score of 60% or higher in 2 tries

4)   Complete Practice 1 with a score of 60% or higher in two tries

5)   Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries

 

Note that you MUST complete the Practice 1 and Recall before you will be allowed to complete the Post-test. Remember that these are NOT timed activities, so slow down and focus.

 

--Choose any (at least) two-page passage or article to read actively. This means you need to use a three-step process as you did on Reading Process Assignment #1. It doesn’t have to be done that way exactly, but it needs to involve pre-reading, during-reading and after-reading activity. This means I need to be able to SEE your actions in writing, such as pre-reading questions, annotations or notes, a reaction after reading. In your after-reading response, please explain WHY you chose this text for the assignment. Just be honest. Your reason doesn’t have to be complicated.

 

You could print something from a website, a magazine or newspaper, a couple of pages of a book you are reading—even a textbook you have to read for another class. I want it to be a published text though rather than a story your friend is working on, for example. Please include information about the source of the text (not a formal citation—just where you found it).

 

 

 

Due Wednesday, 2/14/18

 --Complete the Main Idea Activity on pp. 39-42 in Handout Packet #1.

 

 

Due, Monday 2/19/18 

 --Complete the two MRL modules on main ideas: Stated Main Ideas MRL R3.3 and Implied Main Ideas R3.4. Look at your MRL handout for directions on what is required for this type of assignment as well as how to access it. Remember you must be in the READING SKILLS LEARNING PATH to find this module.

To receive full credit for a MyReadingLab module you must complete the following:

6)   Read the overview

7)   View the Model OR the Animation

8)   Complete the Recall with a score of 60% or higher in 2 tries

9)   Complete Practice 1 with a score of 60% or higher in two tries

10)Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries

 

Note that you MUST complete the Practice 1 and Recall before you will be allowed to complete the Post-test. Remember that these are NOT timed activities, so slow down and focus.

 

 --Complete Reading Process Assignment #2 found in Handout Packet #1, pp. 33-35.

--Study any notes you took during class on vocabulary strategies, look over your flashcards, and review the MRL Vocabulary module (R3.2) to prepare for Word Parts Quiz #1. The focus will be on the word parts, but there will be questions on the strategies (like word analysis and context clues) as well.