SPRING 2016

RHT 095-006 - Meets M 7-9:45pm Room E143

HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS 

 

Due 4/25/16

 Read over the Taking a Position - Argument Essay Assignment handout packet. Complete the activities on p. 2,

 numbers 1-5 only. To work through these five steps, you will do the following:

    --Comment on and self-evaluate the essay you wrote in class on 4/18 using the grading sheet on p. 4 of the packet.

    --Decide which of your two practice in-class argument essays to rewrite.

    --Complete the prewriting chart on p. 145 of your book. This involves brainstorming about different people who would have an opinion on your issue and considering what their arguments for or against would be (like we did in class with the sex-ed app issue).

    --Fill in p. 146 of your book AND generate 3 sides of prewriting (one for each supporting point--can be freewriting, clustering, or a combination).

    --Use your p. 146 notes to help you revise (if necessary) the key sentences (thesis with plan and three topic sentences) for your essay. Type the outline, print it and label the parts.

    

 

Due 4/18/16

--Use the Illustration Essay - Rewrite handout packet as a guide to completing the final draft packet for this assignment. If you are up-to-date on the parts that have been due, you just need to complete steps 8-10 on the instruction sheet (complete the Rewriting Plan pp. book 121/122 / Use those notes and my emailed comments to revise and edit your rough draft into a final draft / highlight the changes on your FINAL DRAFT / put your final draft packet together using the checklist on p. 3 of the handout packet).

--Complete the MWL Writing Skills Verb Tense topic in the Sentence Skills module.

o   Read the Overview or view the Animation

o   Complete the Recall 1 activity

o   Complete the Apply activity

o   Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries  

 

 

 

 Due 4/11/16

I did not pass out a separate homework assignment this week. Instead, I passed out a packet which included the Illustration Essay Assignment (see below for that detailed guide to completing this rewrite).

When you follow the assignment sheet, only complete steps 1-7 for next week. Stop at #8. For next week, you should complete the following for the rewrite of one of your illustration paragraphs into an illustration essay:

--Key sentence outline, typed and parts labeled - Note that it's possible that the only difference between your paragraph outline and this one might be the inclusion of a plan of development in the main idea sentence (thesis).

--Three full SIDES of freewriting, one for each supporting point. Think in terms of stories (anecdotes or scenarios) that will illustrate each point. Remember, this is freewriting and not a rough draft, so don't worry about correctness, unity, coherence, editing. Just keep writing quickly and without stopping.

--A two-page (full sides) typed rough draft of your five-paragraph illustration essay. If you only have a one-sentence introduction and conclusion for now, that's okay. We'll discuss how to write those paragraphs next week.The format should be double spaced, 12 point Times New Roman font with 1-inch margins.

You need to bring hard copies of the three parts listed above. However, don't forget that you also need to email the rough draft to me by class time, preferably as an attached Word document.

 

Illustration Essay – Rewrite Assignment

You will be rewriting one of your illustration paragraphs (stress, mayor, influence, heritage or proud moment) as an illustration essay. This essay must (at the end of the introduction) have a thesis statement that makes a main point about the topic and contains a parallel plan of development listing the three supporting points in order. Each supporting paragraph must begin with a topic sentence that connects back to the thesis (unity). Anecdotes (brief real-life stories that illustrate a point) provide good examples in this type of essay (support). Clear organization also is essential. Paragraphs should be arranged in a logical order (same order as they are listed in the thesis plan) and ideas connected with transition words or phrases (coherence). The arrangement of details WITHIN paragraphs must also be logical, with similar ideas being grouped together.  The final paragraph should be a conclusion, which restates the thesis and summarizes your supporting points. Finally, your sentences throughout the essay must contain FEW spelling or grammar errors.

 

How to proceed:

1)     Look over your three illustration paragraph final drafts. Decide which of these papers you will rewrite into a two-page five-paragraph essay. It’s a good idea to choose one that already has a strong three-part structure. You also need to think about which topic will generate the most support. For this essay, you will use personal anecdotes (brief, real-life stories) as evidence, except for the mayor topic, which would include scenarios. DO THIS TONIGHT.

2)    After you have three clear, unified supporting points that will work in an essay (may be the same ones you used in the paragraph; may be revised to be broader; you may use the previous main point this time as ONE supporting point and add two more (if you will not have enough support with the original supporting points). Rewrite your original topic sentence into a thesis statement with a parallel plan of development (see p. 106 and p. 113). Type this TONIGHT for me to review.

3)    Once I’ve checked out your thesis in class, create a revised key sentence outline. Read over my comments of the original final draft. If I suggested there were issues with any of the supporting points (too narrow, too broad or just off-topic) you will need to revise these to make them more effective.

4)    Edit your key sentence outline for any grammar/spelling errors, save it and print it out. Label the parts of the key sentences on the hard copy (see p. 113). If you can’t label a part, it means that you need to revise before submitting it. DUE Monday, 4/11/16.

5)    For each supporting point in the essay, complete ONE FULL SIDE of freewriting, focusing on anecdotes (what DID happen) or scenarios (what COULD happen). These stories should have a beginning (use a time transition), middle, and end. Do NOT rush through the stories. See sample final draft in the book.  The freewriting is DUE Monday, 4/11/16.

6)    Be sure to end each supporting paragraph with a tie-in sentence for UNITY. This is a sentence that connects the anecdote to your overall point of the paragraph.

7)    Compose the essay rewrite by including an introduction ending in a thesis with a plan, 3 supporting paragraphs (one for each point) and a brief concluding paragraph. The draft should be two FULL pages. This ROUGH DRAFT IS DUE Monday, 4/11/16. Bring a hard copy to class and email the draft by class time. If you do not email the draft by class time, do not expect to receive my comments on it.

8)    Complete the checklist and plan on pp. 121/122. We’ll start on it in class on 4/11/16.

You’ll be expected to finish it and put it in your final draft packet.

9)    Using any of my comments (in-class or via email) and your rewriting plan notes, you’ll rewrite the essay, highlight changes on the final draft, and turn in the final draft packet.

10)  Use the checklist to be sure you have all pieces, including the checklist, in the packet. FINAL DRAFT PACKET DUE Friday, 4/18/16. Remember to use the correct FORMAT: TWO FULL pages, typed, double-spaced in 12 pt. font with a 1” margin.

 

RHT 095-006 Homework for 4/4/16

--Complete the MWL Writing Skills Recognizing the Essay topic in the Essay Development module.

o   Read the Overview or view the Animation

o   Complete the Recall 1 activity

o   Complete the Apply activity

o   Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries

 

--The final draft packet of your descriptive paragraph about the house is due. The checklist (which needs to be included with the final draft packet) is at the end of this homework assignment entry along with a step-by-step rewriting guide.

 

Be sure to print two copies of the final draft. On ONE of them (the one you'll staple in your packet), highlight changes from the rough draft AND label the key elements listed on the top of p. 97. The other final draft, separate from the packet, is the extra reading copy.

 

If you don't turn the packet in on time next week, you can still turn it in late (by Wednesday in my mailbox or under my office door) with a 10% grade reduction for lateness. After that, the grade will be 0.

 

Your packet MUST include a rough draft AND a rewritten final draft. If the packet doesn’t contain both, it will receive a “No Grade.” This means I will return the packet to you, and in order to receive a grade you must resubmit it by the following Wednesday with BOTH drafts in it for a point reduction of 20%. If you do not resubmit by the deadline, the grade becomes a 0. If you really didn’t rewrite the draft, it makes more sense to do that and turn the packet in late, since that penalty is only 10% off.

 

When rewriting, remember to apply the descriptive techniques. Replace vague nouns and verbs with more precise ones. Add sensory details or make them stronger with precise words, adjectives or adverbs. Be sure to use figurative language at least once. Bring the house to life and keep sentences lively by using active verbs and combining sentences when appropriate. Also, try and be concise. For example, place adjectives before the nouns they describe.

 

--Read pp. 103-119 in your book. Explain five things you learned or reviewed about writing an essay using complete sentences.

 

 

REWRITING the Descriptive Paragraph

1)    Read over your rough draft for any uses of any form of the verb TO BE or TO HAVE. Highlight these. When you rewrite, REWORD these using more ACTIVE VERBS (see p. 91).

2)    Read over your rough draft for any sequences of sentences where more than one sentence uses the same subject. Consider COMBINING these sentences. You will be able to REMOVE repetitive words to make it more concise. You should also be sure to put adjectives in front of the nouns they describe (see pp. 89 and 92).

3)    Once you have made these changes, create a Rewriting Plan for your paragraph using p. 95 from your book.

4)    Also refer to p. 97 and the grading sheet on p. 101 for reminders of what’s expected to be in your final draft.

5)    Use your rough draft notes and rewriting plan to REVISE and EDIT the rough draft into a final draft. Remember to create a vivid picture of the house in your reader’s mind with sensory details, precise words, adjectives and adverbs, and figurative language.

6)    It may help to review the comments on your illustration final/rough drafts to avoid similar errors/issues.

7)    Rewrite the draft, save it with a file name different from that of the rough draft, and print out two copies of this final draft.

8)    On one copy of the final draft, label the key elements as from p. 97 (see bottom of the page for a labeled sample draft). Also, compare your final draft to the rough draft. On the FINAL DRAFT, highlight anything that changed from the rough draft. If you removed something, put a capital R where it was removed.

9)    Use the checklist (handout, NOT the one in the book) to put your final draft packet together to turn in next week.

 

 

RHT 095 – Descriptive Paragraph Checklist        Name:_____________________

Your final draft packet should include all of the following stapled together in this order. Please check off all elements included in your packet. Points will be deducted from the final paragraph grade for missing elements.

 

* clustering

* typed key sentence outline, labeled

* Rough draft with highlighting per directions

* Musker comments – IGNORE THIS

* your handwritten rewriting annotations (labeling from plan p. 95)

    * Rewriting plan (p. 95)

* Final draft

* changes from rough draft highlighted

* key elements labeled (see requirements on p, 97)

* at least 14 sentences

           * double spaced

      * 12 point font

* 1 inch margins

* Grade sheet (p. 101)

* Extra copy final draft (does not have to be highlighted or labeled) separate from packet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RHT 095-006 Homework for 3/28/16

--Complete the MWL Writing Skills Pronoun Case topic in the Sentence Skills Module:

o   Read the Overview or view the Animation

o   Complete the Recall 1 activity

o   Complete the Apply activity

o   Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries

o    

--Complete the Descriptive Clustering as described on the handout distributed in class.

--The typed key sentence outline and rough draft of your descriptive paragraph is due. Just as with your illustration paragraphs, you will be using a three-part structure for this assignment. So once you complete your clustering, review it to decide what your three supporting points will be. PLEASE NOTE on the clustering assignment sheet there are suggestions for supporting point groupings.You will use your clustering about the house to write a key sentence outline for this paragraph as well as the rough draft. Look at the Writing Guide on pp. 82/83 and the sample draft on p. 85. Remember that overall, you are trying to create a dominant impression of this house in the reader’s mind. The options for that dominant impression are assigned on the clustering handout. If you want to use a different adjective for your house, you need to get my approval via email first. Just as before, the draft should be at least 14 sentences. Bring a hard copy of the draft and outline. Also bring the flash drive with the rough draft on it.

--Complete the Illustration Paragraph Reflection Assignment on p. 75. Read over your graded illustration paragraphs with comments. Using the comments on both rough and final draft, consider the strengths of your papers and those parts that needed work. Complete the top part of the worksheet. This should be written in complete sentences. I would expect it to be at least six sentences long. Then review your editing errors. Note two errors you made repeatedly. Consider them in order of importance, starting with run-ons and fragments as most, then SV or VT, and WW, MW, PL, PRO as the least. Choose two of the most serious types of errors you made. Explain what the error is, how you will try and find it next time and how you will fix it (for each of the two). Include an example of a sentence with each error from your draft and a corrected version. Look at the sample reflection assignment on pp. 73/74, but do not use any exact wording from it. Just look it over to get the basic idea.

   

 PLEASE NOTE: We do not meet on 3/14/16. Triton will be on Spring Break at that time. I will see you again on 3/21/16.

No homework is due on that night. Enjoy your break!

If you did not turn in any final draft packets on Monday night, they will be accepted for a late grade up until Friday (3/11) at noon (12pm). You can slip them under my office door (E102D) or put them in my faculty mailbox in the office right around the corner from mine within E102. YOU CANNOT EMAIL ME FINAL DRAFT PACKETS FOR CREDIT!! Any packets not turned in by noon Friday will earn 0/50 points for a grade.

 

RHT 095-006 Homework for 3/7/16

  

--Study for the midterm test (50 points). I distributed a review sheet in class on 2/29 to help focus your studying. You will have 50 minutes to complete the midterm.

--The three final draft packets for your illustration paragraphs are due.

This will include the completion of a Rewriting Plan (p. 61), for the third draft which I did not comment on via email. If you sent me a draft late or not at all and so have no comments, you are expected to complete a Rewriting Plan for that (p. 63 or p. 65).

Be sure to fill in the final draft packet checklist (p. 68) to match the pieces you actually have in each packet. You CANNOT turn in drafts that are not typed for credit. You also cannot turn in a packet with a rough draft that has not been rewritten into a final draft. You will not receive a grade for such a packet.

You have two choices next week. You can come to class with your packets ready to turn in or with all of the pieces of your packets ready to assemble. We will put the packets together at the end of class. If you are ready to turn yours in right away, I’ll check them over as you work on the midterm. If they look good, you can leave after the midterm. If not, you’ll need to finish whatever is not complete and then turn them in. THIS DOES NOT INCLUDE REWRITING!! You are expected to have all of your drafts rewritten before coming to class next week.

Any packets not turned in next week during class will be considered late. They must be turned in by 11am on Friday 3/11/16 (hard copy only) to receive credit. After that, the grade will be a zero. The grade for papers turned in after 3/11 will be reduced by 10% or one letter grade. You can put them under my office door (E102D) or in my mailbox in the English Department Office.

--Complete the MWL Subject-Verb Agreement topic within the Sentence Skills module in the Writing Skills Learning Path. To receive full credit (15 points each) for a module you must complete the following: 

o   Read the Overview or view the Animation  

o   Complete the Recall 1 activity 

o   Complete the Apply activity  

o   Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries 

  

REWRITING  

For rough drafts 1 & 2, you will have emailed comments at the end of the draft, in the right margin, and editing marks within the draft. If you do not see comments in the margin, be sure you have downloaded the file and are viewing it in “print layout.”

It might help you to refer back to pp. 16-19 as a reminder of the editing abbreviations. You also might look at p. 15 for a reminder of common revising problems and how to fix them.

Because you do not have comments on rough draft #3, you are expected to complete the Rewriting Plan on p. 61 for that draft. This will be turned in with your final draft packet.

To REWRITE:

1)     Read over all of my emailed comments on your rough draft. Email me questions or be prepared to ask me any questions if there is time in class. You are expected to understand and follow my suggestions. If you don’t agree with one of my suggestions, you need to discuss it with me before you ignore it. If you can argue for why you don’t need to make the change, that’s okay, but you can’t just decide on your own.

2)     Look over your drafts and create an Editing Checklist. Make a list of any grammar or spelling errors that occurred more than twice through the three drafts. If I gave you any advice on what to watch for or to use EDIT/FIND for, make a note of that.

 

o  EDIT/FIND the word “your.” Reread those parts. If I mean to say “you are,” replace “your” with “you’re.”

 

o  EDIT/FIND the word “when.” If it is at the beginning of a sentence, make sure I did not just punctuate that dependent clause as a sentence or I’ll have a fragment. Be sure it’s attached to an IC.

 

3)     Print out the copy of the rough draft with my comments on it.

4)     Depending on the draft, I will assign you a certain type of revising activity to complete.

5)     Either pull up the rough draft with my comments OR your original rough draft on the computer. Some students like to rewrite the commented-on draft. That way, you might be more certain not to miss a correction. However, you have to be sure to delete my comments. The other choice is to work with your original draft and have the printed copy with my comments on the side. You’ll refer to that printout to see what changes you need to make. As you make an edit or revision, check it off with a pen to make sure you don’t miss any.

6)     Save your final draft WITH A DIFFERENT FILE NAME.

7)     Print out the final draft.

8)     Highlight ON THE FINAL DRAFT any changes you made from the rough draft. If you removed a word or section, put an “R” on the final draft in the spot where the removal took place. So, yes, your FINAL DRAFT will be highlighted. It’s supposed to be for this class.

9)     When the final draft packet is due, you’ll turn in all the work that led up to the final draft. There is a checklist in your book to make sure you include all the pieces. We’ll review this together in class. All the final draft packets will be turned in on the same day.

All three FINAL DRAFT PACKETS due: 3/7/16

 

Midterm Exam Review Sheet 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The lists below remind you of the concepts we’ve discussed so far this semester which you’ll be tested on. The test will consist mostly of multiple choice, true/false and fill-in-the-blanks, identifying good versus bad topic sentences, evaluating and creating key sentence outlines. The numbers in parentheses indicate page numbers from your book that may be useful to review.

 

To study, make sure you can:

--Identify the prewriting techniques (p. 13)

--name the three major steps of the writing process and know the key purpose and techniques for each (p. 14)

--identify well-written topic sentences   (pp. 39-40)

--identify revising changes to improve unity or support or coherence (p. 15)

--know the correct location (for this class) for a topic sentence (p. 39)

--know the parts of a topic sentence and a supporting point sentence (p. 47)

--know the difference between editing and revising   (p. 14)

--know the purpose of unity, support, coherence (pp. 28/29)

 

Define these terms:

Topic sentence

Paragraph

Rough draft

Freewriting  

Vague

Illustration paragraph

Sentence

Clause, independent and dependent

Unity

Support

Coherence

 

You need to review the following handouts or exercises:

 

Page 49 (key sentence outline writing)

Key Sentence Outline evaluation handout

Page 40 (topic sentences)

Caps and plural editing practice sheet

Run-on and fragment editing practice sheet

Subject-verb Agreement editing practice

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________

RHT 095-006 Homework for 2/29/16

 

--Read pp. 165-168 on finding and fixing fragments. Then complete the exercise on p. 169. Note that TEN of these are fragments. You are supposed to fix the fragments by adding words or entire clauses. For the seven sentences, you should label the subject and verb in each.

--Complete the MWL Fragment topic within the Sentence Skills module in the Writing Skills

Learning Path. To receive full credit (15 points each) for a module you must complete the following:

o   Read the Overview or view the Animation

o   Complete the Recall 1 activity

o   Complete the Apply activity

o   Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries

 

--Complete the activity on p. 31.

 

--Complete your stress rough draft and one of your other illustration topic rough drafts, and email them to me by midnight Thursday. Use the comments on these drafts to help you compose the rough draft of your other illustration topic. Be sure to email me the stress rough draft and whichever other rough draft you want my emailed comments on. Print out the third draft and bring it with you to class next week.

 

Review the Illustration Paragraph Writing Guide in your book (pp. 43-46) and the Illustration Paragraph Assignment below to help you review how to compose the rough draft. Remember, you do not have to rewrite these yet. We will discuss rewriting next week. The final draft packets for the three illustration paragraphs will be due by the end of class on 3/7.

 

Illustration Paragraph Assignment

COMPOSING THE ROUGH DRAFT

You have already completed freewriting/clustering and a key sentence outline for each of your three illustration paragraph topics.

Now you need to compose the rough draft. These drafts will be written and submitted one at a time (see due dates below). You will email these drafts to me as attached Word documents by the due date for each.

To compose the rough draft:

1)     Pull up the document with your REWRITTEN outlines on it. The first rough draft due will be the stressful thing paragraph.

2)     If all of your outlines are in one document, copy the stress outline and paste it into a new Word document. Name this file so that you know it’s the rough draft (ex. stressrd).  Be sure it’s saved to your flash drive.

3)     Add specific detail to prove each of the three supporting points from your outline. You are expected to USE THE OUTLINE SENTENCES IN YOUR ROUGH DRAFT!!

The outline is just the structure, like a skeleton, and now you have to put flesh on the bones. In this case, that means adding specifically detailed examples that ILLUSTRATE the point you are trying to make in that part of the paragraph. Look back at your clustering or even your freewrite for specific evidence that proves your point. If you can’t find any, do more pre-writing. SHOW the reader by providing a snapshot with words that captures a specific moment in time that proves your point.  (Note that in addition to this sheet, you can also refer to the Writing Guide pp. 43-45.)

For example, if it’s a paragraph about your mom being a positive influence, and one supporting point is that she is supportive, think of an example that SHOWS her at a moment when she was being supportive.

SUPPORTING POINT: For one thing, my mom is very supportive.

Specifically detailed (concrete) example(s) that follow this point--

NOT: For example, she always encouraged me in whatever I did. She helped me however she could. THIS IS INEFFECTIVE EVIDENCE. IT IS TOO VAGUE. Avoid words like “whatever, whenever, always, everything, something, anything.” Instead pinpoint a time she actually supported you.

BETTER: For example, she always encouraged my interest in sports. No matter how hard it was raining or how hard the cold wind was blowing, my mom was in the stands cheering me on during my football games. When I played soccer, she made it to every game, even though some were two hours away.  EFFECTIVE EVIDENCE. THE READER CAN SEE HER BEING SUPPORTIVE.

4)     Then include a sentence to tie the examples back to HER INFLUENCE – the main point. This is a TIE-IN sentence for UNITY, to connect back to the main idea.

 

TIE-IN EX. Because of her support, I was able to pursue my passion for sports.

So this draft so far would look like this:

ILLUSTRATION PARAGRAPH DRAFT - IN PROGRESS

              My mom is a positive influence in my life. For one thing, my mom is very supportive. For example, she always encouraged my interest in sports. No matter how hard it was raining or how hard the cold wind was blowing, my mom was in the stands cheering me on during my football games. When I played soccer, she made it to every game, even though some were two hours away. Because of her support, I was able to pursue my passion for sports.

In addition, my mom’s work ethic has had an impact on me.

*Most importantly, my mom’s example of generosity has had a positive influence on me.

*Note that emphatic order is used here because the most important point is last.

The sentences in italics are the rewritten outline. The writer has added AT LEAST TWO SENTENCES of concrete examples to part one along with a tie-in sentence (above in bold) for unity. The writer needs to do the same for parts two and three and add a concluding sentence that restates the main idea. You should NOT use italics or bold. I only did that to make the different parts stand out.

5)     Provide specific examples and a tie-in for points 2 and 3.

6)     Add a concluding sentence that restates the main idea.

7)     Once you complete your rough draft (AT LEAST 14 SENTENCES), make sure it’s saved to your flash drive.

8)     Email the draft to me as an attached Word document by the due date.

Remember that there is an illustration paragraph example in your book (p. 11), a Writing Guide (pp. 43-47) to reinforce how to compose the draft, a list of transitions on p. 30, and either the Youtube video or the module in MWL (not assigned) that you can reference for guidance as you write your rough drafts.

 

 

 

MY REWRITING COMMENTS

Once I receive the stress rough draft, I will then respond via email with rewriting (both revising and editing) suggestions. You should check your email for my response with rewriting feedback

You may have comments at the end of the draft, in the right margin, and editing marks within the draft. If you do not see comments in the margin, be sure you have downloaded the file and are viewing it in “print layout.”

You DO NOT have to rewrite the rough drafts as soon as you get them back. I will review rewriting comments with you in class. It might help you to refer back to pp. 16-19 as a reminder of the editing abbreviations. You also might look at p. 15 for a reminder of common revising problems and how to fix them.

Read over all of my emailed comments on your rough drafts. Email me questions or be prepared to ask me any questions next week in class. You are expected to understand and follow my suggestions. If you don’t agree with one of my suggestions, you need to discuss it with me before you ignore it. If you can argue for why you don’t need to make the change, that’s okay, but you can’t just decide on your own.

 

 

RHT 095-006 Homework for 2/22/16

--Read pages 159-162 in your book, and complete the run-on activity on p. 163. Only ONE is correct. Read the directions carefully. You are to provide two possible corrections for EACH of the nine run-ons, NOT USING A PERIOD OR SEMI-COLON BY ITSELF.  

--Complete the MWL Run-on topic within the Sentence Skills module in the Writing Skills

Learning Path. To receive full credit (15 points each) for a module you must complete the following:

o   Read the Overview or view the Animation

o   Complete the Recall 1 activity

o   Complete the Apply activity

o   Complete the Post-test with a score of 70% or higher in 2 tries

 

--Complete the Key Sentence Outline assignment. See below for detailed instructions. 

 

KEY SENTENCE OUTLINE ASSIGNMENT  (15 points)

DRAFTING THE FIRST VERSION

1)     Using pp. 47 and 49 as a guide, compose a key sentence outline for each of your three illustration paragraph topics.

--Each of these outlines will be four sentences: the rewritten topic sentence (based on my feedback to the topic sentences you emailed me) and three supporting point sentences.

--Your clustering can help you come up with the three supporting points.

--Remember that these must be distinct points (not repetitive), points of equal value (not “First my boss makes my job stressful” and “Secondly, it’s stressful when my boss yells at me for not wearing my nametag.” In this case, the second one is more specific than the first and is an example that should be in part one rather than its own supporting point.), and expressed as grammatically correct sentences.

        2) Email these outlines to me no later than noon on WEDNESDAY. These can all be typed and          

            saved as one Word document to be attached to your email.

 

REWRITING THE OUTLINES

1)      Pull up the email with my comments on your outlines and print it. You should receive this from me by Friday if you sent your outlines by the deadline. In case I’m ahead of schedule, you can start checking for my comments Thursday. If you do not receive them on Friday and you sent them by noon Wednesday when they were due, please email me. It’s possible I may not have received your original email. The sooner we determine that, the better. If you sent them late, yours will go to the end of the line as far as the order in which I will return them with feedback.

2)      Read over all of my emailed comments on the rough version of your outlines. This is often easier to do on the screen because if there are margin comments, you can click on them and more easily see what they refer back to.

3)      If you have any questions, email me. You are expected to follow my suggestions. If you don’t agree with one of my suggestions, you need to check with me before you ignore it. If you can argue for why you don’t need to make the change, that’s okay, but you can’t just decide on your own.

4)      Pull up either the rough version with my comments OR your original outlines on the computer. Some students like to rewrite the commented-on version. That way, you might be more certain not to miss a correction. However, you have to be sure to delete my comments. The other choice is to work with your original outline document and have the printed copy with my comments on the side. You’ll refer to that printout to see what changes you need to make. As you make an edit or revision, check it off with a pen to make sure you don’t miss any.

5)      Save your rewritten outlines WITH A DIFFERENT FILE NAME.

6)      Print out the rewritten version.

7)      Highlight ON THE REWRITTEN VERSION any changes you made from the original and label the parts of the key sentences as on p. 47.

Staple the original version with my comments to the rewritten, highlighted, labeled outlines.

 

   Due Monday, 2/15/16

 

--Email the three illustration paragraph topic sentences to me BY NOON WEDNESDAY, 2/10 (see attached sheet for detailed assignment instructions). I will send them back with my comments by Saturday at the latest. Read over my comments and rewrite the topic sentences. DO NOT just write over the old ones. Save the rewritten versions with their own file name. Print the rewritten sentences out and staple those to a printout of the original topic sentences with my comments. On the rewrite, highlight anything you changed from the original version.  

--Read pp. 153-156 in your book and complete p. 157.  

--Complete the MWL Writing Skills Path Builder and the Sentence Structure topic in the Sentence Skills module (see MWL handout for detailed assignment instructions).  

--Reread pp. 43-47 in your book about Illustration Paragraph writing. Watch the video (link below) on the same topic. Write down three numbered sentences explaining what you learned (or reviewed) about drafting this type of paragraph. Also, look for two differences in terminology or drafting advice between the video and the book Writing Guide and write a sentence explaining each.


 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hP-CLjZjHBU 

 


Illustration Paragraph Topic Sentences Assignment  

--You are now shifting into the writing (or drafting) step of the larger writing process. For this Illustration Paragraph assignment (p. 33), you will be writing three separate illustration paragraphs on three separate topics. You'll use the ideas you've generated through your freewriting and clustering (prewriting step). The first decision to make is to decide what your main idea will be. Remember it has two parts: a narrow topic and a point about the topic. The first decision will be how narrow to make your topic. The narrower, the better since you are only writing paragraphs. However, don't make it so narrow that it's a fact that can't be argued.

For each of your three topics, type up a topic sentence (can be on the same page) and email them to me preferably by the end of class—definitely no later than noon Wednesday. I will review these and send my comments back to you via email. 


Please note: For most of these topic sentences, you only have to come up with the narrow topic. The journal assignment provided the point.


EX. 1) ________________ stresses me out. I've already assigned the "point" of "stresses me out." Remember to make this one specific thing in your life that is stressful to YOU.

EX. 2) My _________________ heritage plays a major role in my daily life.

EX. 3) ______________________ is a positive influence in my life. In this case, you could narrow the point by making the paragraph about someone who has a positive influence on one area of your life. EX. My sister has had a positive influence on my educational life.  

EX. 4) _____________________ was a proud moment in my life. OR ______________________ is an achievement I'm proud of. OR _____________________ is a talent I’m proud of.  

EX. 5) If I were mayor of _______________________, I would make several improvements. It would be more effective to narrow this down to improvements in one aspect of city life. EX. If I were mayor of ____________________, I would improve the public transportation system.


Once you receive my feedback on these via email, read over my comments and rewrite the topic sentences. DO NOT just write over the old ones. Save the rewritten versions with their own file name. Print the rewritten sentences out and staple those to a printout of the original topic sentences with my comments. On the rewrite, highlight anything you changed from the original version. 

 

 

 

Due 2/8/16

--Complete the three illustration paragraph clusterings, using narrower versions of your journal topics (ex. ONE stressful thing in your life, ONE positive influence). Remember to follow the directions on p. 36 and review the sample on p. 37. Be sure that the outer circle details are specific. You should not write a clustering so vague that I could come up with the same one! Number each circle when finished and write the total number of circles at the top of the page.

 --Watch the following video and write down three differences between the video explanation of the writing process and mine on p. 14 in your book. To explain a difference, you must include BOTH sides of the contrast. You can't just say "On page 14, it says XXXXX about prewriting." That doesn't explain the difference. Instead, you need to say "On page 14, it says XXXXX about prewriting, whereas in the video, it states XXXXXX."  

  http://www.watchknowlearn.org/Video.aspx?VideoID=12512  

--Read the illustration paragraph sample on p. 11 in your book and complete the questions about it on p.12. This is an assessment. Just do your best. Do not leave any blanks.

--Read pages 13-19 and 28-30 in your book. Complete a “5 Things Learned” assignment (see p. 9 for detailed directions).

 

 

  Due 2/1/16

 --Buy your book (listed on the syllabus and only available at the Triton Bookstore / price $17), purchase the materials required for class (see the syllabus and handout/book page 8), and get a current Triton ID (no cost at the Welcome Desk in the B building--bring two forms of ID and your course schedule). 

 --Read your syllabus and complete the syllabus worksheet in your handout (p. 5), NOT in the book. 

--Complete the Campus Resources Assignment (handout p. 7).

--Complete the Student Information sheet (handout pages 3 and 4).

--Watch the YouTube video on prewriting by clicking this link:

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j27mMyGWfM . 

 If the link doesn't work, go to Google and type in -- the writing process: prewriting you tube. The video is about ten minutes long. You might need to watch it a couple of times to be sure you understand it. Choose three things you learned from the video and write each as a sentence IN YOUR OWN WORDS. Do not just copy an exact quote from the speaker. If you have any questions, jot those down too.

 --Complete Journal One (p. 34), which consists of three sides of freewriting TOTAL—one side for each topic you use from p. 34. Remember to look at the sample on p. 35. This is NOT an organized piece of writing. Just keep writing ideas as they come to you and don’t worry about spelling, grammar or organization. Try not to reread, cross out or erase.